Tuesday, November 17, 2009

For Those Trying to Work the System

Just a little advice here.

When you come down to your kids' school to see about getting on the list to receive the care packages we put together for Christmas, it's not really smart to drive up to the school in a car that's nicer than those owned by most of the staff and the administration in the building. Yeah, we know you're really proud of that gleaming 2009 SUV, but when the teachers are driving cars that are at least ten years old, it's not really cool. Granted, you may have gotten it with drug money (I mean, who's to say?) but still...be cool. Walk to the school. Or take the bus. But don't flash around in your Escalade.

And another thing. We know you're really attached to that snazzy little bluetooth thing wired into your head, but since you're there to ask for free food for your kids because you can't possibly feed them, you may want to consider leaving all your electronic toys at home. Tuck that nice little iPod out of sight, unplug the damn earbuds from your ear, and for heaven's sake, stop the texting while the ladies in guidance are trying to help you. It's rude.

And then there's the clothes. Remember, you're here to ask for free food and clothes for your kids, because you can't possibly afford to feed and clothe them yourself, so it's a good idea to dress modestly. That means leaving the designer jackets and tennis shoes at home. And ladies, let's try to keep our bosoms covered up - this is your kid's school, not a try out for a Shakira video, so we don't need to be seeing your boobs. Especially when they're covered with about $1,000 worth of tattoos. Come to think, make sure you remove all those piercings and cover up those pricey tattoos so we don't really find out what your spend your money on.

I'm just saying...

10 comments:

Rachel said...

*sigh* I hate that. Honestly, I have a very jaded view of charity systems like that. I volunteered at a food bank where, yes, I saw some genuinely in-need people. But there was also a disgustingly high number of people who matched the description you just gave. And that wasn't the only place I saw it. I know it's helping people who need help, but it also makes me mad to know I'm being taken advantage of.

ChiTown Girl said...

OMFG!! I could have written this about MY freakin' school!!!!! UGH! What is UP with these people!?

Dragonrider said...

Oh yeah! Don't forget the perfume they marinate themselves in, and the torn clothes their children wear or the school supplies they can't provide.

Lady said...

I have a kid who brings her son to class (alternative high school) because "she can't find affordable childcare" (nevermind that she's turned down every resource we've offered her) and yet has a MUCH nicer cell phone than mine. I hate seeing crap like you described--it's just so offensive to me.

John Spencer said...

When I worked for an inner-city nonprofit, they developed a system of "empowering the poor," which meant nothing was a free handout. Nothing. Even the health clinic had copays.

Within two years, there was more parental involvement, the facilities were taken care of better, an increase in indigenous leadership and an overall sense of ownership.

Instead of giving stuff free to students, I have my students go on service trips with me. We learn (it's in the standards) about financial planning and money management. I wish entire schools would shift toward a philosophy of empowering the poor rather than a welfare mentality.

KT said...

You crack me up!

Katie

Yellow rose said...

That's one reason why I give through a local charity called P.A.T.H. (People Attempting to Help). They clear people who really need the help, and we have too many of them to waste money on those who buy fancy rims for their cars. We also have a large food bank, an impressive Salvation Army facility, and a basic but important men's homeless shelter. All are facing increased usage in the past year.

Vicki Betts
Texas

kherbert said...

A few years ago our social worker spotted families from our school scamming multiple charities. As a result she got the heads of the different charities together and now they share the names of the families they are helping. That way the help gets spread through more of the community.

Also it isn't strange for us to find things like bikes we have given the kids at pawn shops.

Polski3 said...

Whenever we visit one of my families favorate charities with our donation, we usually come away with a few scratches, bits of fur on our clothing and even a few clean spots where we were kissed.... the cat department of our local humane society.

Darren said...

I work in a very upscale neighborhood and at one time drove a Kia Rio. I kid you not, it was the cheapest car in the parking lot--and not just the staff parking lot.